How and Why the U.S. Has Re-Started the Cold War (The Backstory that Precipitated Ukraine’s Civil War)

Same game it never ends. Worldwide domination.

Should you carefully read this article you will clearly understand what the conflict in the Ukraine is about. And yes, do not expect to read this in your local newspaper.



Washington's Blog
By Eric Zuesse
3 June 2014

When the Cold War ended, in 1990, Russia was in a very weak position, no real threat at all (except for nuclear weapons, but the nuclear rivalry had been greatly reduced via arms-control agreements). Communism was proven to have failed as an economic system, and this failure of communism had left a former U.S.S.R. that was decayed and unproductive. The Russian people were in misery. Alcoholism, which was historically a huge problem among Russian men, and which kept Russia’s overall life-expectancy figures remarkably low, was rampant. Here, courtesy of Trading Economics, is a chart showing the longevity of Russian men (the main victims of alcoholism), during the period from 1980 to 2010 (Russia’s transition out of communism, and into capitalism): [image above]

As you can see, there was a burst of progress at the end, right before 1986, when the fading regime merely relaxed controls (while it started a campaign against alcohol-consumption) and didn’t go into capitalism, but this progress mildly reversed during the reign of the liberal Mikhail Gorbachev, 1985-1991, and it sharply plunged during 1991-1994, which was the period of the libertarian Boris Yeltsin’s privatization of Russian industries. Russia’s climb-back, after that libertarian surge, was brief, ending in 1998, and Russia still hasn’t yet improved itself beyond the Soviet era. Communism had certainly failed there, but capitalism also failed there — or at least the capitalism that Russia tried did, and this capitalism was designed for them by the Harvard economics department, the capitalist world’s dominant economics department: it was mainstream economic theory being put into practice in a non-capitalist economy, capitalist theory being introduced where there had been no capitalism before. The same economic theory that a decade later would produce the 2008 global economic crash was being applied in Russia during 1991-1998, and it did not get Russia out of the doldrums.

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