Europe has an even bigger crisis on its hands than a British exit

This is a major read for the future of Global markets.

If Britain pulls out, the MTN and BG markets are in Euros, they will fail. The entire Global Banking Market will then fail.

Yes - YOURS!

No Pensions, no Welfare, no Money! No Cards. No Gas, No food stores. No drugs or medicines. No anything but Martial Law.

Got it?



British people will vote to leave the EU unless offered a new dispensation, writes Ambrose Evans-Pritchard

The Telegraph
By Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
28 May 2014

If Europe's policy elites could not quite believe it before, they must now know beyond much doubt that they have lost Britain. This island is no longer part of the European project in any meaningful sense.

British defenders of the status quo were knouted on Sunday. UKIP won 27.5pc of the vote, or 29pc after adjusting for the negligence - or worse - of the Electoral Commission in allowing a spoiler party with much the same name to sow confusion. Margaret Thatcher's Tory children are scarcely more friendly to the EU enterprise.

Britain's decision to stay out of monetary union at Maastricht sowed the seeds of separation, as pro-Europeans fully understood at the time, though almost nobody expected EMU officialdom to clinch the argument so emphatically by running the currency bloc into the ground with 1930s Gold Standard policies and youth unemployment levels above 50pc in Spain and Greece, and above 40pc in Italy.

European leaders must henceforth calculate that the British people will vote to leave the EU altogether unless offered an entirely new dispensation: tariff-free access to the single market along lines already enjoyed by Turkey or Tunisia; and deliverance from half the Acquis Communautaire, that 170,000-page edifice of directives and regulations that drains away sovereignty, and is never repealed.

Ideological hardliners would prefer to see Britain leave rather tolerating any reversal of the one-way Monnet Doctrine, and some talk of shutting British goods out of the European markets. They are fanatics. Others know that the EU's global credibility would be shattered if one of its largest states - and twin-leader in projecting military power - were to walk away in disgust, as Germany's Wolfgang Schauble has repeatedly warned.

read more

Exclusive: Bush Committed War Crimes Says Ex-Counterterrorism Czar Richard Clarke

This will air next week. It's messy, it's Bush.


Humor | A Testimony of True Friendship - a smile for the day


A man brings his best mate home for dinner unannounced at 5.30 p.m. after work.

His wife screams at him as his friend listens in.

"My hair and makeup are not done, the house is a mess, the dishes are not done, I'm still in my pyjamas, and I can't be bothered with cooking tonight!

What the hell did you bring him home for?"

Says husband, "Because he's thinking of getting married."

Turning Air Into Water | World News Australia

In time we may use our God given intellect to help humanity.

Why Are Food Prices so High? Because We're Eating Oil

Oil has its layers of prices it seems. Need to think another way now.
"In effect, the influences of monetary inflation and supply/demand show up in food via the price of oil. Until we stop eating oil (10 calories of fossil fuels are consumed to put one calorie of food on the table), oil is the master commodity in the cost of food."
Plain and simple logic.



Regardless of what we eat, we're actually eating oil

of two minds
By Charles Hugh Smith
28 May 2014

Anyone who buys their own groceries (as opposed to having a full-time cook handle such mundane chores) knows that the cost of basic foods keeps rising, despite the official claims that inflation is essentially near-zero.

Common-sense causes include severe weather and droughts than reduce crop yields, rising demand from the increasingly wealthy global middle class and money printing, which devalues the purchasing power of income.

While these factors undoubtedly influence the cost of food, it turns out that food moves in virtual lockstep with the one master commodity in an industrialized global economy: oil. Courtesy of our friends at Market Daily Briefing, here is a chart of a basket of basic foodstuffs and Brent Crude Oil: [above]

In other words, regardless of what we eat, we're actually eating oil. Not directly, of course, but indirectly, as the global production of tradable foods relies on mechanized farming, fertilizers derived from fossil fuel feedstocks, transport of the harvest to processing plants and from there, to final customers.

Even more indirectly, it took enormous quantities of fossil-fuel energy to construct the aircraft that fly delicacies halfway around the world, the ships that carry cacao beans and grain, the trucks that transport produce and the roads that enable fast, reliable delivery of perishables.

read more